Sir Cumference and the Dragon of Pi Free Printable

Sir Cumference and the Dragon of Pi Free Printable

Sir Cumference and the Dragon of Pi, a Math Adventure

by Cindy Neuschwander, illustrated by Wayne Geehan

In Sir Cumference and the Dragon of Pi, a Math Adventure, Radius (the name is referred to but not described in math terms) saves his father’s life after accidentally turning him into a fire breathing dragon.  Of course, a math formula is the reason for the solution.  Did you know Sir Cumference named Pi in this story?  Did you know this story tells how the math formula for ∏ was discovered?  This is a fictional story but the author’s purpose is achieved when children remember this math lesson.

This is my free PDF work page set which is also for the other Sir Cumference book I have reviewed on this blog, Sir Cumference and the Great Knight of Angleland.

Pi Day Link Up Flickr – Photo Sharing!

Did you know March 14 (think about it) is Pi Day in many schools?  At school pies are perhaps served at least in the teacher’s lounge on this day to accompany this story and the learning of this formula:  circumference divided by diameter = Pi or ∏

Free lesson using this book from the Alabama Learning Exchange

Pi Day Activities Links from Education World  (many links)

Teacher Pi Day ideas are shared on this page

Sir Cumference and the Dragon of Pi Free Printable

This post is linked up to the 2 Peas and a Dog Wild Wednesday Freebie Link up for Math Grade 4 and up.

Wild Wednesday Math Freebie Link up buttonThanks for reading, Carolyn

About Carolyn Wilhelm

Carolyn Wilhelm is the author of The Wise Owl Factory, The Wise Owl Factory Book a Day Blog, and is web master for the Wise Owl Factory Teaching Friends blog She has an MS in Gifted Education, an MA in Curriculum and Instruction K-12, and is a National Board Certified Teacher.
This entry was posted in Free Printable Book Companion, Math Stories and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Sir Cumference and the Dragon of Pi Free Printable

  1. Carolyn,

    Thank you so much for linking up with me! I love the pages you offered as well!

    ~Michelle

  2. Audey, yes it will work with grade four or five. They will understand the math part more than the younger children. Thank you for writing. Carolyn

  3. Audrey Mitchell says:

    I’m seeing the book for the first time but I have heard about it at workshops and seen it mentioned in articles. I teach a Grade 4 class but I think my students will benefit from it.
    Thanks for the offer.